Upper Hunter MP Michael Johnsen to attend Hunter-Queensland gas pipeline meeting

UP FOR DISCUSSION: Monday's meeting will centre around the proposed Hunter-Queensland gas pipeline project.
UP FOR DISCUSSION: Monday's meeting will centre around the proposed Hunter-Queensland gas pipeline project.

LANDHOLDERS concerned by the potential impacts of the proposed Hunter-Gas pipeline project will have a meeting on Monday with the project's leaders after help from Liverpool Shire Council.

The council helped organise the June 29 meeting after receiving a letter from concerned locals urging the council to change its position regarding the project.

Councillors debated the letter during its recent session before resolving to help facilitate the meeting between company owner Garbis Simonian and concerned landholders.

Liverpool Plains mayor Andrew Hope said he and Upper Hunter MP Michael Johsen would also be attending the meeting.

"The affected holders are getting the opportunity to meet with the company and I feel like we have done our duty in facilitating that," Cr Hope said.

"At the end of the day, this is a state [significant] project and we're not the decision-making body, but it is our duty to give the community an opportunity to have representation and I believe we have done that."

Councillor Ken Cudmore was in favour of Monday's meeting, saying he believed it was the council's duty to help bring the parties together.

"My point of view is I don't see why the council can't be facilitating the discussions with the company, the landowners and everyone else that is part of the arrangement," Cr Cudmore said.

"The people are ratepayers and while we don't want to get involved, we should be able to facilitate and get everybody at the same table, because we don't want the gas pipeline to go through that agricultural land.

"It would be nice if the council supported them now in the discussion process."

Cr Rob Webster said while the council should help organise the meeting, it was not responsible for making decisions regarding the project.

"It's a state-significant project, so it's really discussions between the state government, the company and the landholders," Cr Webster said.

"It's really not our baby."