Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse in the Newcastle Anglican diocese day four | live blog

Bishop Brian Farran at the commission on Friday.
Bishop Brian Farran at the commission on Friday.

Friday, August 5

Solicitor Keith Allen to give evidence.

2.57pm

Solicitor Keith Allen outside Newcastle Courthouse on Friday to give evidence at the royal commission.

Solicitor Keith Allen outside Newcastle Courthouse on Friday to give evidence at the royal commission.

Solicitor Keith Allen is being questioned about an amendment to his statement so that it says Stephen Hatley Gray resigned on February 16 1990 and not an earlier date.

The date of the resignation is significant because it is signed as February 11 1990, although Bishop Richard Appleby saw Gray to ask for his resignation on February 12 1990. Gray was charged with sexually abusing a boy on February 12 1990. Keith Allen acted as solicitor for Gray, an Anglican priest, who was convicted of sexually abusing the boy. Mr Allen also held positions in the Anglican diocese.

Naomi Sharp, counsel assisting, is questioning Mr Allen, who has been a solicitor since 1971.

Allen: “I have been on a number of diocesan committees over the years. I was elected to diocesan council and then went off diocesan council for a period of time and then went back. I served as a trustee for 25 years (finishing in 2014). I was chairman of committees of the Synod for a number of years and on various other diocesan committees.”

Sharp: “Is it right that you’ve served as a member of the diocesan synod for around 44 years?

Allen: “I was first elected to Synod when Bishop Shevill was bishop (1973 to 76.)”

Justice McClellan: “During that time have you acted as the solicitor for the diocese?”

Allen: “Yes, I acted as solicitor in a conveyancing matter.”

McClellan: “Have you ever given advice to a bishop in relation to a matter?”

There was a pause.

Allen: “No, but I probably had discussions where bishops have asked me questions.”

McClellan: “Well, did you respond to the questions by giving advice?”

Allen: “I would have made comments to bishops over the years.”

McClellan: “And by comment, I take it, you gave them advice?

Allen: “That’s so”

McClellan: “And do I take it you did that over many years for many bishops.”

Allen: “Yes.”

McClellan: “Have bishops over the years asked you for advice from time to time?”

Allen: “Yes, I would, I’d say yes, sir.”

McClellan: “Can you give us an indication of the types of matters you’ve been asked for advice?”

Allen then went on to talk about advice about an unlicensed priest during Bishop Holland’s time.

Naomi Sharp has resumed questioning.

Sharp: “Is it fair to say that during Biishop Holland’s tenure as bishop, you had the ear of that bishop?”

Allen: “Yes.”

Sharp: “And you were one of his confidants?”

Allen: “Probably yes.”

Sharp: “Is it fair to say that during the tenure of Bishop Herft you had the ear of the bishop?”

Allen: “Yes I’m happy to say, yes.”

Sharp: “Is it fair to say that during the tenure of Bishop Farran you had the ear of the bishop?”

Allen: “Yes, I’d probably say so.”

Sharp: “Is it fair to say that you were one of Bishop Farran’s confidants?”

Allen: “I would say yes, on some occasions.”

Is it fair to say you had the ear of bishops Holland, Herft and Farran?

Naomi Sharp, counsel assisting the royal commission

,

Yes.

Keith Allen, solicitor and holder of senior Newcastle diocesan positions

Sharp: “Has it always been your view that you have owed a duty to the diocese to protect its interests?”

Allen: “I have looked after and been mindful of the interests of the diocese.”

Sharp: “Has it always been your view that you have had a duty to act consistently with the duties that the diocese owes other people?”

Allen: “Yes, in respect of fairness, yes.”

Sharp has just asked for a document to be brought forward, a confidential Newcastle diocese document on “principles and procedures for dealing with sexual harassment by ministers in the diocese of Newcastle”.

The document includes the line: “The diocese acknowledges its obligation to offer pastoral support to all who seek or need it; this includes complainants, respondents, their families and parishes.”

Sharp: “Does this come as a surprise to you that the diocese acknowledges that it has an obligation to offer pastoral support to complainants?”

Allen: “No.”

Mr Allen has agreed he is married to Dr Sandra Smith. They have been married since 2013. She has worked as a psychiatrist until April this year.

Mr Allen said he first met Paul Rosser, QC “many ,many years ago”.

Sharp: “During the entirety of the time you’ve known Mr Rosser, have you been aware that he has been involved in the governance of the diocese?”

Allen: “Yes, he was the Deputy Chancellor and then the chancellor for a period.”

Sharp is now questioning Allen about his relationship with Bishop Arthur Holland.

Bishop Alfred Holland

Bishop Alfred Holland

Justice McClellan is now questioning Keith Allen about a meeting he had with Newcastle diocese business manager John Cleary.

McClellan: “In the course of that meeting as this minute records, you gave advice?”

McClellan: “You were giving advice?”

Allen: “There were discussions which may have been interpreted as advice, yes.”

McClellan: “Well that’s a very oblique way of talking. Mr Allen. Can’t we just be frank. Were you not giving your opinion on various matters?”

Allen: “yes.”

McClellan: “You see, on that first page, if you look towards the bottom of the screen ‘Allen advised that it will be a small claim”.

McClellan: “That sounds to me like legal advice, is that right?”

McClellan: “The minute says ‘Allen advised that he is assisting Michael Day with this claim.

He goes on to say ‘I found this strange that Allen was assisting a victim of abuse to sue the diocese when Allen is a board member of the diocese and Allen himself advised me that he advised Mr and Mrs CKM’s parents that they can sue the diocese but I can’t act for you’.”

McClellan: “What this is talking about is a suit against the diocese. And in fact it wouldn’t be honest of a solicitor to act in that way, wouldn’t it?”

Allen: “No, one can’t act for both parties.”

McClellan: “No. Indeed beyond being unprofessional, it would just be dishonest, wouldn’t it?”

Allen: “yes.”

Naomi Sharp has resumed questioning Keith Allen.

John Cleary’s file note of the meeting in February 2015 says Keith Allen “advised that the diocese will receive a claim soon for CKM through solicitor Michael Daley. Allen advised he is good friends with Daley and often does locum work for Daley when Daley and his wife are holidaying overseas”.

John Cleary’s note says: “Allen advised that it will be a ‘small claim’ and that it will be resolved with a few letters. Allen advised that he is assisting Michael Daley with this claim. I found this strange that Allen was assisting a victim of abuse to sue the diocese when Allen is a board member of the diocese and Allen himself advised me that he advised Mr and Mrs (CKM’s parents) years ago that they can sue the diocese but ‘I can’t act for you”.

John Cleary”s note says ‘Allen still holds membership to most of the boards he did back then so I couldn’t understand what has changed. I wondered whether Allen was getting paid by Daley for suing the diocese and advising Daley of the internal workings of the diocese and whether the litigation would be in no way connected to Allen as it was through Mr Daley.”

John Cleary’s note goes on to say: “I also wondered that, because Allen advised it will be a small claim that Allen has in some way minimised the claim … and also minimised the criminality of the matter by not pursing charges against CKN. I also wonder whether this has all been assisted by Mr Allen’s wife (Dr Sandra Smith’s) medical diagnosis and care of CKM as his treating psychiatrist.”

Allen has just denied “in any way leaning upon Mr Daley to make a claim of a modest or small nature”.

Child abuse survivor CKU’s mother gives evidence

2.10pm

The royal commission has resumed. CKU’s mother CKR has resumed giving evidence.

Justice McClellan is questioning CKR about the evidence relating to Anglican priests making a vow of celibacy.

McClellan: “Perhaps I should tell you, I was brought up as an Anglican, I didn’t understand that Anglican clergy took a vow of celibacy?”

CKR: “No, that was the confusion when I left the office and I was walking away feeling a bit stupid going there and that didn’t add up to me.”

CKR is now talking about her memories of Peter Rushton.

“That name stuck in my, if you like, subconscious over the years and what brought it to the conscious was that when I went the second time to Morpeth and the first , I think it was the first community eucharist, I walked in and sat down and I looked annt there was Rushton. He’s still got a licence but the rumours during those years was that Rushton liked little boys.”

Sharp: “You’re clear the rumours were little boys?”

CKR: “Yes.”

CKR has just told the royal commission that Morpeth college was “an awful place”.

“You had people running off with other people’s wives and disappearing off college. I mean, it was, I couldn’t believe all this stuff was happening on this college and they didn’t seem to be much control in the place.”

CKR is now being questioned by barrister Mr Heazlewood for Bishop Farran.

Heazlewood asked if she remembered receiving flowers from Farran. CKR became quite angered in the witness box when questioned about the flowers and how it made her feel at the time, just before the trial involving her son and Anglican priest Ian Barrack.

You had people running off with other people’s wives and disappearing off college. I mean, it was, I couldn’t believe all this stuff was happening on this college and they didn’t seem to be much control in the place.

CKR, female Anglican priest about St Johns College Morpeth

CKR said she “didn’t appreciate them”.

“I certainly did not get any help whatsoever and I did not receive a support person to come alongside CKU and I. To send somebody a bunch of flowers, I would have flushed them down the loo to tell you the truth.” 

CKR: “I was harassed and bullied by this man (Bishop Brian Farran.”

Heazlewood: “Madam let me put it to you then very clearly, that there were a number of emails that you sent that expressed a contrary view.”

CKR is being questioned by Mr Healy for Archbishop Herft about a conversation she says occurred with Herft in which he said he had received information from the Ombudsman.

Healy: “Is it possible that he had been informed, he told you that he had been told that by (solicitor) Robert Caddies?”

CKR: “Not what I can recall.”

CKR is now being questioned about her evidence that Bruce Hoare “often has young boys staying with him”.

Mr Harper for Mr Hoare: “The entirety of your information came from?”

CKR: “Ian Barrack.”

Mr Harper: “When you say that you’d heard rumours.”

CKR: “There were always rumours around in Newcastle diocese.”

CKR is being questioned about the wind-up toy of a man having sex with a sheep given to CKR’s teenage son by trainee priest Ian Barrack.

CKR has given evidence that Bishop Roger Herft and Archdeacon Bruce Hoare gave her the toy after she took it to Hoare and complained about it. She has given evidence that it was their view she should give it back to Ian Barrack and tell him she wasn’t happy about it and thought it was highly inappropriate.

There were always rumours around in Newcastle diocese

Anglican female priest CKR, whose son was sexually abused by a priest

CKR has told the royal commission that her son-in-law and daughter had made written statements about the figurine “but they had sent it into Bishop Herft”.

Mr Harper: “For completeness, I suggest to you that you provided those statements to Hoare.”

CKR: “No I didn’t.”

CKR has repeated that when her son, CKU, disclosed the abuse and decided to go to the police she decided to contact Bruce Hoare.

“He was in charge of ordinands and priests.” She said she thought it was appropriate to speak to him about Barrack and he would inform Bishop Herft.

Harper: “Finally Bruce Hoare has no recollection….”

CKR: “I bet.”

Harper: “...of being asked by Dean Graeme to speak to you about what was happening in the case. Are you sure what happened?”

CKR: “It definitely happened. I won’t tell you what I said to him because it’s not very polite and I hung up.”

CKR is being questioned by barrister Ms David for Roger Dyer.

David: “Would you agree that you were very dependent upon the Bishop’s approval of you to continue practising the ministry that you loved?”

CKR: “I believe the pressure I received from when I moved from the parish to another parish, that I was almost seen as a very troublesome and had to be sort of ousted out.”

CKR said she had a conflict of interest because she was a mother but she also had to be obedient to her Bishop.

CKR: “You have obedience to your Bishop and I couldn’t be obedient to my Bishop.”

David: “Bishops are very powerful figures in a diocese, aren’t they?”

CKR: “Oh yes, yes.”

CKR has completed her evidence.

1.00pm

The hearing has adjourned for lunch.

Here’s a recap of what has happened so far:

  • Bishop Appleby continued to give evidence, where he continued to say he was unaware of the child sexual abuse allegations during his time in the dioceses.
  • A 32-year-old man (CKU) abused as a minor by trainee priest Ian Barrack has told the royal commission of the way the man groomed him and convinced his mother to trust him.
  • The mother of CKU, CKR is giving evidence relating to the abuse of her son by trainee priest Ian Barrack.

You can follow and join the conversation on Twitter by using the hashtag #shinethelight.

12.03pm

The royal commission has resumed and a woman, who will be known as CKR, is giving evidence. CKR is survivor CKU’s mother, who trained as an Anglican priest.

CKR is a rector in a UK Anglican diocese.

In August 1972 CKR married her husband, who went on to train as a priest at St John’s Theological College, Morpeth.

While on campus CKR said she heard a lot of rumours about “certain people and certain priests, concerning homosexual activity happening amongst people on campus, and about certain priests who might fancy little boys”.

CKR expressed concern about people going on to be ordained.

She was told that “when it came time for these people to be ordained they would have to take a vow of celibacy, but while they were at college they did not”.

“I decided to just keep my head down and do what I had to, to cope with living on campus.”

CKR trained at Morpeth and became a priest in the 1990s.

CKR said she did not realise that Ian Barrack, an Anglican priest, was only accepted for ordination on the third occasion “on account of his confusion about his sexuality”.

CKR has told the royal commission she received an envelope of documents, anonymously in 2003/04 after Barrack was charged with sexually abusing her son, with documents about Barrack’s selection process as a priest.

I decided to just keep my head down and do what I had to, to cope with living on campus.

CKR, Anglican priest whose son was sexually abused by a St Johns College trainee priest

CKR said her son would often sleep over at Barrack’s house on Friday nights.

“At the time I did not think this was odd because we were in a Christian community. Ian was married,” CKR said.

“As time went on, Ian seemed to require more of CKU’s company.”

“By June 1998 CKU started to spend so little time at home that I became concerned. Ian began to ring CKU if he came home from school and did not go to Ian’s house first. By June 1998 Ian was buying CKU expensive presents such as model ships and planes. I spoke to Ian and told him this was not good for CKU.”

CKR said she became concerned about the relationship between Barrack and her son.

CKR: “I decided to begin keeping a more watchful eye on Ian’s contact with CKU.”

“As 1998 progressed (my son) seemed to change. He was 13 years old. He became unapproachable, reclusive, secretive and obsessed with computers. CKU spent most of his time at Ian’s home or alone in his room.”

CKR has told the royal commission that trainee priest Ian Barrack repeatedly said she should let her son stay with him rather than send him to an Armidale boarding school.

“In October 1998 Ian sent me horrible letters outlining how responsible I was for sending CKU to Armidale.”

CKR has told the royal commission Barrack said she should let her son stay with him or with Newcastle archdeacon Reverend Bruce Hoare who “customarily had various boys residing with him at Christchurch Cathedral clergy house”.

As 1998 progressed (my son) seemed to change. He was 13 years old. He became unapproachable, reclusive, secretive and obsessed with computers. He spent most of his time at (trainee Anglican priest) Ian’s home or alone in his room.

Mother CKR

By the end of 1998 CKR said she became suspicious that “something sexual was happening between Ian and CKU”.

“I thought it was time to separate Ian and CKU as things were becoming too intense,” CKR said.

CKR has told the royal commission CKU had changed.

Reverend Bruce Hoare "customarily had various boys residing with him at Christchurch Cathedral clergy house”.

Mother CKR tells royal commission

“He was not happy, he didn’t talk and he didn’t laugh,” she said.

“I decided to report the incidents with the sheep figurine and CKU’s exposure to pornography through Ian to the Reverend Bruce Hoare,” CKR said.

“I did this expecting the diocese would take some disciplinary action against Ian. When I showed Rev Hoare the sheep figurine he laughed and did not appear to think it was offensive or inappropriate.

“Rev Hoare took the sheep figurine from me and told me he would show it to Bishop Roger Herft before getting back to me.”

The royal commission has been told Rev Hoare was the ministry development officer for ordinations and examining chaplains. He was essentially the supervisor for Barrack at Morpeth.

“The day I went to see Rev Hoare to complain about the toy was the same day Ian was in a selection conference.

“Despite my complaint and failing his ordination training, Ian was allowed to remain on campus and continue with his studies.”

 Bishop Roger Herft.

Bishop Roger Herft.

CKR has told the royal commission that Bruce Hoare later said he had shown the toy to Bishop Roger Herft and they had agreed I should return the toy to Ian and tell him it was inappropriate and express my displeasure.

“There was no mention of the diocese taking any action to reprimand Ian.”

CKR has told the royal commission that Barrack became very angry when she called and they had the meeting.

“I told him I had shown the sheep figurine to Rev Hoare. He punched a wall and this frightened me. I asked him to leave,” she said.

CKR said she received a letter from Bishop Herft in May 1999 asking for a meeting.

A Department of Community Services representative, police officer, Bishop Herft, Reverend Hoare, diocese business registrar Peter Mitchell and one other unidentified person were at the meeting to discuss a complaint in relation to Barrack that included the sheep figurine.

CKR has told the royal commission she had a separate phone call with Herft.

He said he had spoken with the Ombudsman in response to a question she had posed about duty of care for children at Morpeth campus if priests were away.

“Bishop Herft said the Ombudsman had told him that the diocese did not have a duty of care to either me or CKU or anyone else in the college because we were renting accommodation and were not live-in students. Bishop Herft said the duty of care remained with parents in spite of the fact the diocese paid everyone’s rent.”

CKR said she spoke to her son in 2002.

“Right mate. Why are you so afraid of Ian?”

CKR has told the royal commission she spoke to Reverend Bruce Hoare, and told him her son had been sexually abused by Ian Barrack while they lived at St Johns.

“Reverend Hoare told me he would take the matter up with Bishop Herft. I later discovered that Bishop Herft had asked Rev Hoare to look after me, by which I presumed Rev Hoare would be my contact person with respect to my complaint,” CKR said.

CKU complained to Singleton police in 2002.

Right mate. Why are you so afraid of Ian?

CKR - Anglican priest and mother of victim of priest Ian Barrack

CKR said she heard nothing from police or the diocese after the complaint.

The assigned detective, Det Mongan, “later told me that because (my son’s) matter was not a current case it was not being given any urgency”.

CKR said she had a later conversation with the detective and insisted they definitely wanted to continue with the complaint.

“Early in 2003 a parishioner of mine complained to me that her son had been brutally abused by a Church of England Boys Society leader,” CKR said.

“I contacted the professional standards committee of Newcastle diocese and spoke with Jean Sanders.”

Mrs Sanders later confirmed to CKR that there were no documents on her case.

Bishop Roger Herft.

Bishop Roger Herft.

CKR has told the royal commission Jean Sanders “rang me to tell me she had been called into a meeting with Bishop Herft, Robert Caddies (solicitor representing the diocese), Bruce Hockman (diocesan business managrer) and Keith Allen”.

“There was another person present and that person I believe was the Rev Graeme Lawrence, the Dean, and that it was a general consensus in that meeting that it was agreed that whoever mentioned ‘Oh we don’t have to worry about this case. It’s never going to get to court’. I think it would have been Bruce Hockman. That’s the memory that has come back to me.”

“I became increasingly angry at the diocese because I felt no action was being taken,” CKR said.

She said she received a letter from Bishop Herft and in that letter, dated 22 August, 2003, “he berated me”.

CKR said she had a conversation over the phone with Bishop Herft in 2004 or 2005 in which he asked what was happening with the court case because he was “going to Lambeth next week and need to know because I don’t want it happening when I am away”.

Oh we don’t have to worry about this case. It’s never going to get to court.

CKR about diocesan meeting about her son's sex abuse complaint

CKR said she received a cheque for $2000 from professional standards director Philip Gerber as an ex gratia payment “as he had hear CKU was travelling overseas and wanted to assist in financing the travel”.

“Whilst the letter from Gerber indicated it was a gift from the diocese and not meant to prejudice any other rights of CKU I believe the payment was an attempt at buying us off,” CKR said.

CKR said Rev Hoare rang her one day to “tell me that the police were coming to interview him and he was scared”.

“I terminated the conversation. A week or so before Ian’s trial Rev Hoare rang me again to say that the then Dean Graeme Lawrence had asked Rev Hoare to ring me to find out what was happening with the case. I was not very polite to him and told him where to go,” CKR said.

CKR has told the royal commission Paul Rosser, QC, was at the court case representing the diocese. Rev Wayne Sheehan, rector of Kurri Kurri, appeared in full clerical dress supporting Ian Barrack, CKR told the royal commission.

She has told the royal commission that she rang professional standards director Philip Gerber to ask why Sheehan was at the court supporting Barrack, while CKU and his mother had no support.

“During the court proceedings in 2006 there was a new bishop for Newcastle diocese, Bishop Brian Farran. At one point the DPP solicitor spoke to rosser as to why he was there and Rosser replied he attended at Bishop Farran’s request.

“I emailed Farran about Rosser’s presence at court. He denied arranging for Rosser to be present. I believe the diocese provided legal representation for Ian during the court proceedings. I say this because the diocese was using the same law firm for their defence of CKU’s civil claim as Ian was using for his criminal defence.”

Bishop Appleby at the royal commission in Newcastle on Friday.

Bishop Appleby at the royal commission in Newcastle on Friday.

CKR has outlined a list of failings of St Johns College’s duty of care: 

  1. Not knowing who was responsible.
  2. Conflicts of interest.
  3. Sense of isolation.
  4. The case wasnot dealt with in accordance with diocesan process.
  5. Lack of suport for the victim.
  6. Support for the perpetrator.
  7. I feel I wa made to feel guilty because I was a priest within the church making these complaints. i felt like I was being completely attacked on many different levels.

CKR said she wrote a letter to Philip Gerber in November 2006 asking 11 questions about the inaction and selection actions and issues of duty of care at Morpeth.

“On numerous occasions that I rang Gerber, I felt like I was being fobbed off,” CKR said.

She rang chair of the professional standards committeee in 2007 and was told “There is not much we can do with the letter as Bishop Roger has gone to higher places, namely, Archbishop of Perth”.

I felt like I was being completely attacked on many different levels. I felt like I was expected to toe the line because I was employed by the diocese.

CKR, Anglican priest and mother of abuse victim

In 2009 she was contacted by diocese business manager John Cleary, with the new chair of the professional standards committee, Dr Ann Taylor.

She met with Dr Taylor and professional standards director Michael Elliott to discuss the letter.

She was not satisfied with the diocese’s response.

“Throughout the entire ordeal I have felt that the church has never acted fairly, compassionately or pastorally,” she said.

CKR completed her evidence with a quote from Albert Einstein: “The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil but by those who watch them without doing anything.”

11.30am

The commission has adjourned for a short recess.

Throughout the entire ordeal I have felt that the church has never acted fairly, compassionately or pastorally.

CKR, Anglican priest and mother of victim CKU

10.59pm

Survivor CKU, son of an Anglican priest, is giving evidence.

CKU is 32 years of age.

Within his first six months at St Johns College, Morpeth, CKU came into contact with Anglican trainee priest Ian Barrack, who lived at the college with his wife.

Barrack was 28 and CKU was about 12. CKU used Barrack’s internet and computer, although CKU and his mum had to pay for the privilege.

CKU said he was an isolated boy, and Ian “would talk and joke around with me and my friend”.

Through this time, after CKU was given Barrack’s home key, “he started pushing the boundaries”.

CKU: “After my friend and his family left St Johns Ian’s behaviour towards me changed. Ian befriended me more and he became touchy with me. It started with a pat on the back, then a rub on the shoulder and it progressed to massages when I stayed over at his house. Each time he pushed the boundaries with where he massaged me.”

CKU: “Mum trusted Ian and let me go to his house all the time. Mum assumed Ian’s wife was home when I slept there but she never was. There was never anyone else around.”

CKU is now talking about the first time Barrack sexually abused him, when CKU was 14.

They were playing a computer game and CKU was sitting on Barrack’s lap.

“I didn’t really click to what was happening because I was concentrating on the game.”

CKU is now giving evidence about being sexually abused over a period of time in 1998.

During that time CKU found images of young naked boys on Barrack’s computer.

“I see you found my secret stash,” CKU said Barrack told him.

Barrack had sexual intercourse with CKU on a Friday night between September and November 1998.

“When I was being abused by Ian I did not know how to feel. I was numb and confused. I felt like it was a dream. I did not know it was wrong. Ian treated it like it was completely normal and I felt confused.”

CKU has just told the royal commission about being given a wind-up toy by Barrack which was the figure of a man standing behind a sheep.

Ian Barrack.

Ian Barrack.

“At the time I thought the toy was funny and I didn’t see a problem with it.”

When CKU started reacting to the abuse, Barrack said that he should not tell anyone because he would be in trouble as a “paedophile”.

“In December 1998 I stopped talking to Ian. I decided I had had enough of the abuse.”

CKU went to boarding school where Barrack sent him three letters.

“I felt hounded by Ian and did not feel safe at boarding school. I knew Ian was friends with Brother James and had access to the school through him. Brother James never said or did anything to me that caused me concern. It was just the fact that they knew each other.”

CKU: “In or around November 1998 I showed the sheep figurine to my sister and her husband. Later that same day Mum came and took the toy away from me. I do not remember what Mum said to me, but she was angry. At the time I did not know what she did with the toy.”

CKU told his sister that Barrack watched pornographic movies with Barrack at his house.

CKU: “They asked questions and I gave one word answers. I felt so embarrassed, there was also a part of me that wanted to protect Ian. However I also hoped that after telling, she or Mum would say something to ian that would keep him away from me.”

CKU said he reported the sexual abuse at Singleton police station in 2002.

Day five of the royal commission in Newcastle.

Day five of the royal commission in Newcastle.

CKU: “Although it felt good for me to tell someone and to get it off my chest, I do remember feeling as if the officer did not really care, his body language  and manner seemed blase.”

“I did not hear anything back from the police for three years until some time in early 2005 when I was contacted (by another police officer.)”

I got so scared and upset I thought he had come looking for me.

Survivor CKU about Anglican priest Ian Barrack

Barrack was charged with two counts of aggravated sexual assault on February 21, 2005.

The charges were later changed to three counts of sexual intercourse with a person aged 10 to 16.

Barrack pleaded guilty to one count of sexual intercourse with a child under 16.

Graeme Lawrence, Newcastle Dean, gave a character reference for Barrack. Barrack was sentenced to two years jail.

CKU: “What upset me during the court process was that Ian had a support person from the church, but the church didn’t support me or my Mum. It felt like a slap in the face.”

CKU has just told the royal commission he received $2000 in compensation from the Anglican diocese of Newcastle even though he was legally represented.

The compensation process lasted nearly two years.

CKU eventually received $60,000 from the diocese in 2009 to include the cost of counselling.

What upset me during the court process was that Ian had a support person from the church, but the church didn’t support me or my Mum. It felt like a slap in the face.

Survivor CKU after Anglican priest Ian Barrack was jailed for a child sex offence

“I was required to sign a deed of release to receive the compensation amount. The deed included a confidentiality clause… to mean that, once signed, I was not allowed to talk about my abuse with anyone, except for a doctor, lawyer or the police. I was told this clause lasted permanently.”

CKU: “Throughout the compensation process I felt like the Anglican church fought very hard to avoid responsibility and deny their duty of care. An apology from the church was an acknowledgement that they were in the wrong and I was happy to receive it.”

CKU: “As a child being abused I felt trapped.”

10.58pm

Bishop Richard Appleby has ended his evidence.

Bishop Richard Appleby gives evidence

10.11am

Good morning. It’s Joanne McCarthy here on the fourth day of the royal commission Newcastle Anglican hearing. Bishop Richard Appleby, former assistant bishop of Newcastle, has resumed giving evidence after a difficult afternoon session on Thursday in which he said he did not recall being told about paedophiles in the diocese, including Peter Rushton. 

Bishop Appleby is being questioned about what he knew about Wyong priest Stephen Hatley Gray, after Appleby was called to Wyong in February 1990 following the “trashing” of Wyong rectory.

A police document has just been tendered which indicates a young person was taken to Gosford District Hospital on February 12 1990. The document indicates Gray was interviewed by police on that day at St James Anglican Church.

The document indicates Gray made “full admissions” in relation to the offence.

Bishop Appleby walking into the commission

Appleby was at the parish on the morning of February 12 1990.

Appleby is now being questioned about why he obtained a resignation letter from Gray for Bishop Alfred Holland dated February 11 1990.

Appleby has just told the royal commission he has no idea why it was dated the previous day. Maybe a mistake, he said.

Naomi Sharp, counsel assisting: “Is it your evidence you did not become aware there was an underage boy involved?”

Appleby: “I did not know until recently.”

Sharp: “Bishop, let me ask you squarely, did you turn a blind eye to the actions of Gray?”

Counsel assisting Naomi Sharp.

Counsel assisting Naomi Sharp.

Appleby: “No.”

Sharp has asked Appleby how he introduced, what he has described as a “much more rigorous process”, in terms of ordaining priests.

Appleby: “I introduced a much more rigorous process with more intensive interviews, residential weekend conferences. It was one of the most rigorous and best processes around the Anglican Church.”

Sharp: “Is it fair to say that at least as at today’s date Keith Allen has given long and significant service to the diocese of Newcastle?”

Appleby: “Yes.”

Appleby said he was aware police were re-investigating the case of priest CKC, previously charged with child sex offences, because police had asked him to make a statement.

He denied speaking to Keith Allen about it.

Sharp: “Could it be that Mr Allen has suggested to you some of the things you might say to the police during that investigation?”

Appleby walking into the commission on day four.

Appleby walking into the commission on day four.

Appleby: “Oh no.”

Bishop Appleby is now being questioned by barrister Peter O’Brien representing survivor CKA.

He is being questioned about solicitor Keith Allen, who was a member of some of the diocese’s committees.

Did you turn a blind eye?

Naomi Sharp, counsel assisting the royal commissioner

Mr Allen represented CKC when he was charged with child sex offences in 1999.

O’Brien: “Did you have anything to do with CKC leaving the diocese?”

No.

Bishop Richard Appleby

Appleby: “No.”

O’Brien: “Did you hear the evidence of (Anglican priest) Roger Dyer… that you had caused (CKC’s) resignation from the diocese?”

Appleby: “I had nothing whatsoever to do with it.”

O’Brien is now questioning Appleby about Anglican priest Arthur Bridge, the priest who we heard yesterday introduced a large art union which caused problems for the diocese.

Barrister O'Brien.

Barrister O'Brien.

“Father Bridge was an able and entrepreneurial priest and the longer he was in the parish he got more and more erratic and this issue of the art union was, as I recall it, the focus for much concern,” said Appleby.

Appleby has just told the royal commission he can find no evidence in his diary that he met with CKA in 1984 about Arthur Bridge, at which CKA said he told Appleby about child sex allegations not only about Bridge, but Rushton and others.

Justice McClellan has just asked Appleby whether “every meeting you ever had would be recorded in your diary”.

Appleby: So far as I know the answer would be yes.”

McClellan: “It would be extraordinary, I would have thought, that anyone in your position would record every meeting they ever had in their diary.”

O’Brien has resumed questioning.

O’Brien is now asking Appleby about his knowledge of CKA’s father and stepmother who were heavily involved with the church at the time. The royal commission was told about CKA’s father’s resignation from diocese positions after a meeting CKA said was held at Appleby’s home, at which Appleby is supposed to have been told about church offenders.

Appleby: “If someone had made a time to come to see me that would be in my diary in my home, yes, that’s quite clear.”

Appleby is insisting the problems with priest Arthur Bridge related to financial issues.

O’Brien has put to Appleby that he met with CKA about Bridge, and then with CKA’s father and stepmother.

Justice McClellan has just warned Appleby that because there is a conflict between his evidence on the point of whether he was warned about CKC and others, and the evidence of others, there were going to be consequences in terms of the commission having to make a determination about who to believe.

Appleby said he recognised that as a consequence. 

Appleby has just delivered his first “I cannot recall.”

O’Brien: You are not telling truthful evidence about what CKA told you in 1984?”

Appleby: “I’m telling the truth, absolute truth.”

O’Brien: “Because it’s gone from a stage where you were protecting the church, protecting CKC, and now you are protecting yourself.

Appleby: “Mr O’Brien the assertion that I was protecting the church and CKC is not true and the fact in your assertion that I am protecting myself is certainly not true.”

I cannot recall.

Bishop Richard Appleby

Appleby is now being questioned by Justice McClellan about Appleby’s evidence about when he first was told about CKC.

Appleby is now being questioned by barrister McLaughlin for Newcastle assistant Bishop Peter Stuart.

Appleby is being questioned about the defrocking of former Newcastle Dean Graeme Lawrence in 2012, who was a parishioner at a parish where Appleby was also a parishioner.

It’s gone from a stage where you were protecting the church, protecting (priest) CKC, and now you are protecting yourself.

Barrister Peter O'Brien for survivor CKA

McLaughlin: “It would be fair to say it was a topic of some note of the parishioners in St Stephens?”

Appleby: “People would have certainly been alerted to that and the degree of sensitivity about it.”

Mr O’Brien the assertion that I was protecting the church and CKC is not true and the fact in your assertion that I am protecting myself is certainly not true.”

Bishop Richard Appleby

Appleby is being questioned about a service at St Stephens church at Adamstown in December 2013 where he did not have the authority from Bishop peter Stuart to do so.

Appleby agreed he did not have permission, and Graeme Lawrence also took part in the service.

McLaughlin: “You didn’t feel that was a breach of the deposition orders that had been made?’’

Appleby: “He wasn’t exercising any priestly ministry so my view would have been, if I had been asked, would have been no, it wasn’t.”

Appleby said it “may well have been wise not to have done that”, but at the time he didn’t think so.

Appleby: “If Lawrence had exercised some priestly ministry in some way, the answer would have been I would have wanted to alert the diocesan bishop of that but he was not doing that and so there was no breach of any church law protocols in that he was simply doing what a layperson may have done. It  may have been unwise.”

Naomi Sharp, counsel assisting, is now questioning Appleby.

She has asked Appleby if he ever saw Graeme Lawrence formally participate in any other services after he was defrocked in late 2012.

Appleby said Lawrence “occasionally” read from the scriptures.

“On any of those occasions did he wear his collar as he did so?” asked Sharp.

Appleby: “No never. Never dressed as a priest, ever.”

Day three wrap up

  • Former Bishop Richard Appleby gave evidence and insisted he had no knowledge of inappropriate relationships or of child sex abuse allegations during his term in the diocese. Questions were raised about the church’s responsibility to the children at the time and the actions the church took after the allegations were exposed.
  • Priest Colvin Ford gave his statements which referred to the “gang of three” who were protecting Peter Rushton. Ford revealed an incident in 1998 incident where which a team of removalists was forced to pack up homosexual pornography – including some allegedly involving children – while its owner, Father Peter Rushton, stood by watching.
  • Child abuse victim CKA gave evidence involving priest child sex abuser CKC, who abused CKA and his brother CKB. CKA talked about the effect the abuse had on his life and the difficulties he had trying to report the abuse. He said the process of reporting the abuse was as bad as the abuse itself.

10.00am

Welcome to day four of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse in the Newcastle Anglican diocese. Joanne McCarthy will continue the live blog from the commission, with Ian Kirkwood and Joanne McCarthy publishing stories throughout the day.

Today we are expected to continue hearing from former assistant Bishop of Newcastle, former trustee and member of Diocesan Council in the Diocese of Newcastle, survivor CKU and family member of survivor CKR.

You can follow and get involved with the conversation on Twitter by using the hashtag #shinethelight.

Bishop Richard Appleby will continue to give evidence today.

Bishop Richard Appleby will continue to give evidence today.

This story Live coverage: Day four of the Newcastle child sexual abuse royal commission first appeared on Newcastle Herald.